Friday, September 7, 2007

Happy Friday Everyone!

I've been getting these flyers in regards to Fuzion Lounge, which is out in Bethesda, MD. Never been but go see for yourself.

And of course, my favorite happy hour on Friday after work on the historical U Street in DC. Barnun baby! Go early.
So Nas finally responded back to what big mouth O'Reilly had to say about him performing at VATech's benefit concert:
“He’s a racist. Everybody has a marketing plan; his marketing plan is racism. He doesn’t understand the younger generation. He deals with the past. The people he represents are Republican, older, a generation that has nothing to do with the reality of what’s happening now with my generation. … He’s not really on my radar. People like him are supposed to be taught and people like me are supposed to let n—as like him know. I don’t take him serious. His sh– is all about getting ratings or whatever. I wouldn’t honor anything Bill O’Reilly has to say. It just shows you what bloodsuckers do: They abuse something like the Virginia Tech [tragedy] for show ratings. You can’t talk to a person like that.”“Here’s somebody that speaks about America in his music, and the community that I come from has the same kind of violence as Virginia Tech. It’s unnecessary, stupid violence. Hip-hop is a part of the generation of [Virginia Tech] as well as alternative and pop and rock. Hip-hop is a part of that. That’s why I’m [performing at the concert]. With Bill O’Reilly, it doesn’t raise an eyebrow to me because it’s garbage, its bullsh–. He has nothing to do with the real people who go to school or the parents who had to endure that tragedy.”
“Let him ask why I made the songs I made,” Nas said. “It didn’t come from nowhere. It came from this country. I’m not talking about Russia in my music. I’ve never been to Russia. I’m not talking about Africa, Switzerland, China. I’m talking about me being American and growing up in a crazy world and helping to reflect all different sides of life. I got songs also about totally different things — ‘Black Girl Lost,’ you feel what I’m saying?”
“I’m still coming. Unfortunately, man, a lot of places in America have to deal with unnecessary violence. Somebody like me who knows it firsthand and could relate, … I had a best friend killed, plenty other friends killed. I been through it. I seen it. My music reflects reality. I think that’s what makes it important that I come through and show love to those people [at Virginia Tech]. They deserve it.”
Tru talk Nastradamus.